Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The Hard Core Vampires Strike Back !! -- Review of Book 2 of Ellen C. Maze's Rabbit Trilogy

NEW SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY REVIEWS
Reviews Of Recently Published Science Fiction And Fantasy Books
Reviewer: Forrest Schultz schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 770-583-3258

August 15, 2017

The  (Hard Core)  Vampires  Strike  Back  !!

A Review of

Ellen C. Maze Rabbit Legacy (Bk. 2 of The Rabbit Trilogy] (Little Roni Pub., 2017)
                        308 pp   $11.95   ISBN-13: 978-0615747828

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz

     In the first book of this trilogy Beth Rider convinces many vampires to repudiate their vampirism and to turn to Christ for salvation.  Seven years later, in the second book, the unconverted vampires organize and mount an attack upon Beth Rider and her converts, thereby reversing the trend of vampires toward conversion.  Since these attackers are hard core vampires, Beth now faces a more difficult challenge.  And she now must do so as a married woman and the mother of a six year old daughter Grace, who is one of the first to be attacked.  This is the main theme of the book but there is also a great deal of material provided dealing with vampire lore as the context of the story.

     Information on the author is found at www.ellencmaze.com   


Sunday, August 6, 2017

P. J. Renfroe Pens A Science Fiction Tale With A Fantasy Atmosphere -- Review of her "Inbound"

NEW SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY REVIEWS
Reviews Of Recently Published Science Fiction And Fantasy Books
Reviewer: Forrest Schultz schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 770-583-3258
 
August 7, 2017

 P. J. Renfroe Pens A Science Fiction Tale With A Fantasy Atmosphere

A Review of

P. J. Renfroe Inbound (Chatham Cabin Pubs., 2013)
                      193 pp   $8.95   ISBN: 978147017017

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz

     The best description I can give of Inbound is to say that is is an ostensibly science fiction story (it has spaceships, space aliens, and space age technology) embedded in and permeated by a fantasy atmosphere.  I invite you to read this tale in order to see and experience for yourself just what I mean.  I believe you will both enjoy its story and be intrigued by its atmosphere.

Friday, August 4, 2017

Jordyn Redwood's New Medical Suspense Includes Espionage and Romance -- Review of her Taken Hostage

NEW SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY REVIEWS
Reviews Of Recently Published Science Fiction And Fantasy Books
Reviewer: Forrest Schultz schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 770-583-3258

August 4, 2017


Jordyn Redwood’s New Medical Suspense Includes Espionage and Romance

A Review of

Jordyn Redwood Taken Hostage (Love Inspired Books, 2017)
                                $5.99   217 pp   ISBN: 978-0-373-45732-8)

Reviewer:  Forrest Schultz


     Jordyn Redwood’s excellent Bloodline Trilogy (2012 & 2013) consisted of a skillful blend of medical and criminal suspense.  Her latest novel (under review here) is not only a worthy successor but also includes strong elements of espionage and romance.  Her afterword to the reader provides the source of her inspiration – two contemporary medical research programs.  And, finally, in the backstory, is the psychological dynamic of the resentment of a man at the superiority of a woman, which is expressed against the main character – neurosurgeon Regan Lockhart – first by her husband and then by her research partner!  As the story opens she then falls in love with the brother of her patient, Colby Waterson, when he becomes her protector against the bad guys who kidnap her and then try to force her to create a biological weapon.  Sooo, there is a lot going on and a lot to think about.   For information on the author you can visit her website at www.jordynredwood.com

Friday, July 14, 2017

Koontz Launches New Criminal Suspense Series: Jane Hawk Uncovers Criminal Nanotech Research Conspiracy -- Review of Koontz's "The Silent Corner"

NEW SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY REVIEWS
Reviews Of Recently Published Science Fiction And Fantasy Books
Reviewer: Forrest Schultz schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 770-583-3258

July 14, 2017

Koontz Launches New Criminal Suspense Series:

Jane Hawk Uncovers Criminal Nanotech Research Conspiracy

A Review of

Dean Koontz The Silent Corner (Bantam Books, 2017) 
                       434pp    $16.75   ISBN:  9780345545592

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz

     With this book Dean Koontz has indeed launched a new criminal suspense series starring a new character (Jane Hawk), but there is nothing new about tough female heroes, and there is nothing new about secret criminal conspiracies run by super-wealthy super-wicked men inventing secret super-dangerous weapons.  There also is nothing new about this story’s beginning with a reporting of many suicides.  What IS new about this story is the WEIRD statements left by the people who have committed these suicides, and the WEIRD super-advanced nanotechnology employed by these weapons.  This sophisticated nanotech procedure is very interesting (and stands in sharp contrast to the crude portrayal of nanotech found in the book Koontz wrote many moons ago (By The Light Of The Moon).  I am hoping that in the future books in this series that Koontz will provide more details about this new nanotech process.  If so, this story will be able to rank as hard science fiction.  I am disappointed with how little Koontz says about it in this book, and the disproportionate amount of the story devoted to Hawk’s forays against the bad guys.  Koontz says on his website www.DeanKoontz.com that “it has what I’d call a scientific premise in the Michael Crichton tradition, something that is not futuristic but here now in an early form with a terrible potential.”

     Another fascinating element in the story, which also needs much more elaboration is the psychological effect which the nanotech procedure has upon the human brain, especially as this pertains to the question of carefully distinguishing between artificial intelligence and man.

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     What is really strange about Koontz’s story is that its similarity between AI and the human brain is NOT produced by raising the level of AI to the level of the human brain, but is produced by the LOWERING of the intelligence of the human brain produced by the effects of the weird nanotech procedure upon it.  You really need to read the story to see how eerie this is!  Humans are seen acting almost like robots as the result!

     As a science fiction fan I wish Koontz would devote most of the story to the nanotechnology and only a relatively small amount to the apprehension of the criminals.  Well, we shall see whether or not he does this in the episodes to come.  The second book in the series, The Whispering Room (which some people are referring to as “Jane Hawk #2) is scheduled for  publication in January 2018.

     I like the character Jane Hawk – a very admirable person.  But, to be honest, I prefer Koontz’s special characters such as Odd Thomas and Stormy Llewellyn.  They are special creations by Koontz himself.  There have been many characters in modern literature, like Jane Hawk, but none like Odd Thomas and Stormy Llewellyn!!  I also would like to see the character Edie Fischer again too, and Alfred Hitchcock again coming down from Heaven!


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Friday, July 7, 2017

Nicholas Kotar Pens Russian Fantasy -- Review of his "The Song Of The Sirin"

NEW SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY REVIEWS
Reviews Of Recently Published Science Fiction And Fantasy Books
Reviewer: Forrest Schultz schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 770-583-3258

July 7, 2017

Nicholas Kotar Pens Russian Fantasy:

The Song Of The Sirin Retells Prince Ivan And The Grey Wolf

A Review of

Nicholas Kotar Raven Son Book One – The Song of the Sirin (Waystone, 2017)
                            373 pp   $11.34   ISBN: 9780998847900

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz

     Nicholas Kotar is an American of Russian descent who has embarked on a mission to revive Russian fantasy beginning with the story under review here.  (This is a change from his original plan three years ago in which Raven Son was the title of the first book, rather than of the series.)  The Sirins in this tale are very good and exalted beings whose songs lead to great blessing, so that they must in no way be confused with the Sirens in Homer’s Odyssey, whose songs lead to destruction.  Another difference is that the Ravens here are much more wicked than the Poe-ic Ravens:  their blackness is comparable to the blackness of Black Holes.  These are but two examples of the uniqueness of the story’s Russian fantasy context, which is suffused with all kinds of concepts with which Americans are unfamiliar.  So, the reader should prepare himself for a wild old-time Russian Ride through all kinds of strange places with all kinds of strange fantasy beings!


    You can get some idea of the author’s perspective by visiting his beautiful and informative website www.nicholaskotar.com.  

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Diana Wynne Jones Creates New Genre: The Comic Witch Drama! -- Review of her Earwig and the Witch

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Patterson Writes Silly SF -- Review of his "Humans, Bow Down)

NEW SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY REVIEWS
Reviews Of Recently Published Science Fiction And Fantasy Books
Reviewer: Forrest Schultz schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 770-583-3258

June 8, 2017

Patterson  Writes  Silly  SF

A Review of
James Patterson and Emily Raymond Humans, Bow Down (Little, Brown, & Co., 2017)
                               373 pp   $12.99   ISBN: 978-0-316-34696-2

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz


     James Patterson is not only one of our nation’s most prolific authors, he also writes in many different genres.  I believe that the book under review here is the first silly science fiction he has written.  Unlike hard science fiction, it is permissible for silly sf and sf opera to be lacking in verisimilitude.  In this particular story the supposed robots, unlike real robots, are depicted as though they possessed human desires, in particular the desire to be despotic rulers.  In hard sf, such as those in the books in Isaac Asimov’s Galactic-Empire/Foundation-Universe series, there is no such danger; rather, the danger is for man to become overly dependent upon robots, i.e. to become robot-addicts!  Patterson’s story is great for fun reading, but Asimov’s stories show us what we really need to worry about in regard to robots!   Realistically, therefore, there is no need to worry about a robot-run dystopia; the dystopia we DO need to worry about is one about over-dependency upon robots!  But if you want some humor, read Patterson’s book!